Degrees don’t matter anymore, skills do

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The top 6 skills today’s employers want

Look out for big things from Gordon Square in 2015! In the meantime, here’s a teaser…

Work In Progress

After four years of college, my son is about to graduate with a degree in Environmental Politics. We are both aware that he is entering the job market at a time when more and more young people cannot find work.

While putting together his résumé, he recently asked me what kind of skills today’s employers want from a new job candidate. A lot of people his age are probably asking the same question, so I thought I’d share a few thoughts.

According to recent surveys, employers these days aren’t just looking for experience. They’re also interested in “softer skills” like problem-solving and creativity that can play as big a role in career advancement as training or education.

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Corporate newsrooms fail to provide what journalists want, study finds

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What do newsrooms want from PR practitioners these days?

Images. Video. Embed codes to ease video delivery on the media’s websites.

So, what are company and organizational newsrooms doing about that?

Not enough, according to a Proactive Report survey by Sally Falkow, president of PRESSfeed: The Social Newsroom. The survey found that 83 percent of journalists regard images with content as important, but only 38 percent of PR pros add images to news content.

Falkow says many corporate newsrooms are failing to provide content and links that journalists “are looking for, and things they think are important, and things that make their jobs easier for them, and that they would therefore use that content more readily.”

The report adds weight to a sense among many publicists and journalists alike that the PR industry hasn’t done enough to adapt to a new, image- and video-based environment.

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Viewers have come to expect videos, Falkow says. Twitter last fall began displaying images in one’s feed, rather than requiring users to click on individual tweets, boosting the importance of pictures.

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